Book Reviews

autobiography, memoir

When Breathe Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi

Reviewed by Lauren Jahn When taking a birthing class, it is often recommended to pack plenty of comfort items. By preselecting loved objects, it is supposed to ease the tension of labor. Following instructions, I packed essential oils, coloring books, silly Putty, and a book about a dying man. When Breath Becomes Air accompanied me… Continue reading When Breathe Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi

poetry

Letters from Max by Sarah Ruhl and Max Ritvo

Reviewed by Melissa Gaiti Where does a person turn when facing stress, grief, or pain? In Letters from Max, we witness connection through writings between Sarah Ruhl and Max Ritvo as their relationship evolves from professor and student to friends. Just as the title suggests, letters are used to tell the narrative and take readers… Continue reading Letters from Max by Sarah Ruhl and Max Ritvo

Classic, Ficton

The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood

Reviewed by Zhenbang Yu Offred is a victim of a regime that thrives on fear and lies. Since Offred has assumed the role of a handmaiden, she has experienced the horrors of witnessing their utmost cruelty the regime has imposed on her.  This has led her to despise the regime for its oppressiveness towards women who… Continue reading The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood

poetry, Uncategorized

Sun & Moon by Michel Weatherall

Reviewed by Mark Antony Rossi The trip of transcendence reaches its zenith when demolishing a stereotype and replacing old tropes with new insight. Weatherall’s poetry collection Sun & Moon is a candid examination of one’s fears and fragilities magnified by a cancer diagnosis of a loved one. How perceptions in such circumstances change and often… Continue reading Sun & Moon by Michel Weatherall

poetry, Uncategorized

The Silent G by Arpine Konyalian Grenier’s

Reviewed by Rich Murphy The Silent G, Arpine Konyalian Grenier’s fifth collection of poetry was published by Corrupt Press of Luxembourg. The collection involves the reader as though we were sitting around a séance table taking part in calling forth victims of violent historical moments. That kind of engagement with the reader is what poets… Continue reading The Silent G by Arpine Konyalian Grenier’s

non-fiction, Science Fiction

Blogs and Books You’ll Want to Put on Your Reading List!

We asked on Twitter for blogs and books to read and had a wonderful response. All of these authors have worked hard to publish articles, short stories, and books. We're happy for all of them and their success. Want to know what all the buzz is about? Then you'll want to check out these blogs… Continue reading Blogs and Books You’ll Want to Put on Your Reading List!

Author, Author Interview

Let’s Chat with Poet and Artist Robert Erlandson

Today we have a very special interview with poet and artist Robert Erlandson by fellow author Carol Smallwood. Smallwood is a literary reader, judge, and interviewer who recently published a poetry collection Patterns: Moments in Time. Smallwood: A member of Michigan Writers, you were born in Detroit; what other places have you lived or traveled? Do… Continue reading Let’s Chat with Poet and Artist Robert Erlandson

poetry

The Sad Girl’s Declassified Heartbreak Survival Guide by Gigi Bella

Reviewed by A. Lawler One of the early nights in June, I dropped by a poetry event at a local bar here in Albuquerque. Gigi Bella was the night’s featured poet. Several writers had already tried their work at the mic, to varying levels of enthusiasm from the audience. By the time Gigi made her… Continue reading The Sad Girl’s Declassified Heartbreak Survival Guide by Gigi Bella

Ficton, Mystery, young adult

The Wanderers By Sarah Barkoff

Reviewed by Aaron Sommers "We pursue that which retreats from us," said the existentialist philosopher Martin Heidegger.  The quote pertains to desires, happiness or knowledge--and it also describes the protagonist's journey in The Wanderers, a fast-paced, eminently readable debut novel by Sarah Barkoff. The novel kicks off in the unsettled world of a post-Hurricane Sandy… Continue reading The Wanderers By Sarah Barkoff

Classic, Ficton, literary fiction

Iris Murdoch, on the Anniversary of Her Birth and Death

Reviewed by S.B. Julian I call them my Irises -- my copies of the novels of Iris Murdoch. They have played such an intimate role in my life that we can't but co-exist on a first-name basis. I found my first “Iris” at age eighteen while back-packing in Europe. Near my hostel in Germany was… Continue reading Iris Murdoch, on the Anniversary of Her Birth and Death